Doctoral students and post-doctoral scientists (chronological order)

Benoît Legresy worked as a post-doc in Toulouse the year following his thesis in 1999. Frederique Remy and I advised him, 80% and 20%, respectively, on the measurement and optimal analysis of the Antarctic contribution to sea leavel. This work led to a paper in Geophysical Research Letters by Legresy, B., E. Rignot, and I. E. Tabacco (2000), entitled “Constraining ice dynamics at Dome C, Antarctica, using remotely sensed measurements [v. 27, 3493-3496]. He now holds a permanent CNRS position in the LEGOS lab (UMR 5566) in Toulouse.

Rikke Pederssen completed her Ph.D. thesis at the University of Iceland in 2004, on INSAR analysis of active deformation in Iceland using ERS. Although her formal academic advisor was Freysteinn Sigmundsson, I advised her frequently on research. We published three papers together [Pedersen et al, 2001; 2003; Pagli et al, 2003]. Since then, she has been working as a post-doctoral fellow at the Nordic Volcanological Center in Reykjavik, where the three of us have a funded research project to monitor active deformation in Iceland using ERS and ENVISAT.

Gilbert Ferhat
completed his Ph.D. thesis at the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse in 1997. Annie Souriau and I shared the supervision 20% and 80%, respectively. His topic, measuring present-day deformation of the southern French Alps by comparison of GPS and triangulation measurements, led to two papers [Chery et al., 1995; Ferhat et al, 1998]. After a post-doc in Japan, he took a permanent teaching position at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Topographes in Strasbourg.

Duong Chi Cong performed research in Toulouse under my sole supervision from 1995 to 1997 on measuring the present-day deformation of the southernmost segment of the Red River Fault by comparison of GPS and triangulation measurements. This work led to his doctoral degree in Hanoi, Vietnam [2000] and a paper published in J. Geodesy [Duong and Feigl, 1999]. He now holds a permanent position as a research scientist at the Geological Institute of the National Center of Natural Science and Technology in Hanoi.

Jêrome Gasperi completed his Ph.D. thesis at the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse under my sole supervision in 1999. His topic, INSAR measurements of seismo-volcanic deformation around the Hengill volcanic center in the South Iceland Seismic Zone, led to a paper in J. Geophys. Res. [Feigl et al. 2000]. He now holds a permanent position an engineer at the CNES space agency in Toulouse.

Andreas Kohlhase worked from 1999-2002 as a post-doc mostly (80%) under my supervision with Didier Massonnet (20%) on empirical modeling of tropospheric perturbations and orbital effects in SAR interferograms with fellowships from ESA and DLR. We published a paper in J. Geodesy together [Kohlhase et al, 2003]. He is now working at the DLR space agency in Germany.

Etienne Berthier completed his Ph.D. thesis at the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse in 2005 under the supervision of Frederique Rémy and Yves Arnaud. Working with Helene Vadon of the CNES space agency in Toulouse, he developed and applied a new method of measuring deformation by correlating remotely sensed images. In this research, he taught me about glaciology and I helped with the geodesy. It led to five papers, of which two I am proud to be a co-author [Berthier et al., 2005; Berthier et al., submitted]. Currently working in Iceland, he plans to start a post-doctoral fellowship in Vancouver, Canada in early 2006.

Carolina Pagli plans to complete her Ph.D. thesis at the University of Iceland in 2006, on INSAR measurement and finite-element modeling of active deformation in Iceland. Although her formal academic advisors are Thora Arnadottir and Freysteinn Sigmundsson, I have advised Ms. Pagli on research, leading to a paper in Geophys. Res. Lett. [Pagli et al, 2003].

Cristina Catita plans to complete her Ph.D. thesis at the Faculty of Science in Lisbon in 2006, on SAR remote sensing. Although her formal academic advisors are Joao Catalao and J. Miguel Miranda, I have advised Ms. Catita on research, leading to a paper in Int. J. Rem. Sensing [Catita et al, 2006]. After completing her thesis, she plans to take a permanent position on the Faculty of Science in Lisbon.

Loic Dubois plans to complete his Ph.D. at the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse in 2006. Dimitri Komatitsch and I share the supervision 50%-50%. His research applies the finite-element method to model co- and post-seismic deformation and stress in the South Iceland Seismic Zone. He is funded by a grant from the European Union. After his thesis, he hopes to work as a software engineer.  A PDF file of his thesis paper, submitted to EPSL is available here.

Salvatore Virdis is working toward a Ph.D. thesis at the University of Sienna, Italy. Although his formal academic advisors  Leonardo Disperati and  Riccardo Salvini, I have advised Mr. Virdis on research. Together, we have a funded research project to measure subsidence in the Lucca plane of central Italy with INSAR.

Samuray Akarvardar plans to complete a Ph.D. thesis in 2008 at both Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse and Istanbul Technical University in Turkey. Her topic concerns satellite radar interferometry measurements of crustal deformation around Istanbul, for which we have a research project funded by the European Union.

Abdelilah Tahayt plans to complete a Ph.D. thesis in 2006 at both Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse and Abdelmalek Essaadi University in Morocco. Prof Taoufik Mourabit and I share the advising. Abdelilah’s topic concerns remote-sensing observations of the M 6 earthquake near the city of Al Hoceima, Morocco in 2004.